Wednesday, November 21, 2018


Spectacular views of coast

Spectacular views of coast


This post contain 28 photos of some amazing views of coast and nature that you ever seen. Take a few moments end enjoy in them….

Formation of Coasts

The main agents responsible for deposition and erosion along coastlines are waves, tides and rivers. The formation of coasts is also heavily influenced by their lithology. The harder the material the less likely it is to erode. Variants in the rock create different-shaped coastlines.

Spectacular views

Whitefish Point


Tides often determine the range over which sediment is deposited or eroded. Areas with high tidal ranges allow waves to reach farther up the shore, and areas with lower tidal ranges produce deposition at a smaller elevation interval. The tidal range is influenced by the size and shape of the coastline. Tides do not typically cause erosion by themselves; however, tidal bores can erode as the waves surge up river estuaries from the ocean.

Spectacular views

Shipwreck off South Manitou Island.

Waves erode coastline as they break on shore releasing their energy; the larger the wave the more energy it releases and the more sediment it moves. Coastlines with longer shores have more room for the waves to disperse their energy, while coasts with cliffs and short shore faces give little room for the wave energy to be dispersed. In these areas the wave energy breaking against the cliffs is higher, and air and water are compressed into cracks in the rock, forcing the rock apart, breaking it down. Sediment deposited by waves comes from eroded cliff faces and is moved along the coastline by the waves.

Spectacular views

Bluffs on South Manitou Island.

Sediment deposited by rivers is the dominant influence on the amount of sediment located on a coastline.Today riverine deposition at the coast is often blocked by dams and other human regulatory devices, which remove the sediment from the stream by causing it to be deposited inland.

Spectacular views

Miners Castle in Fall.

Types of coast

An emergent coastline is a coastline which has experienced a fall in sea level, because of either a global sea level change, or local uplift. Emergent coastlines are identifiable by the coastal landforms, which are above the high tide mark, such as raised beaches. Alternatively, a submergent coastline is a coastline which has experienced a rise in sea level, due to a global sea level change, local subsidence, or isostatic rebound. Submergent coastlines are identifiable by their submerged, or “drowned” landforms, such as rias (drowned valleys) and fjords.

Spectacular views

Miners Beach.

A concordant coastline is a coastline where bands of different rock types run parallel to the shore. These rock types are usually of alternating resistance, so the coastline forms distinctive landforms, such as coves. A discordant coastline is a type of coastline formed when rock types of alternating resistance run perpendicular to the shore.

Spectacular views

Spray Falls.

Discordant coastlines feature distinctive landforms because the rocks are eroded by ocean waves. The less resistant rocks erode faster, creating inlets or bays; the more resistant rocks erode more slowly, remaining as headlands or outcroppings.

Spectacular views

Grand Portal Point.

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Chapel Beach.

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Sleeping Bear bluffs.

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View from Indian Head in winter.

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Miners Castle in Winter.

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Ice on Chapel Beach.

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The Empire Bluffs Trail.

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Storms hitting the west side of North Manitou Island.

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Sunset over the Huron River.

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Grand Haven.

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St. Joseph lighthouse after a winter storm.

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Grand Sable Dunes at sunset.

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1 Comment »

  1. avatar comment-top

    u guyz are great,i would lyke u to submit some pics of these coasts through my email address.i suggest u upload more pics than this.

    comment-bottom

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