‘Tis the Season to Leave Your Car Keys at Home

ALLPICS XMAS DUI Tis the Season to Leave Your Car Keys at Home

‘Tis the Season to Leave Your Car Keys at Home

As the winter months roll around, you can almost feel it in the air that the holidays are upon us. Soon we’ll be sprawled out on the couch after eating too much turkey, and soon thereafter, we’ll be up in the wee hours to watch everyone open their Christmas presents. Unfortunately, the holidays can also bring huge mistakes that, just like those extra eight pounds put on at Thanksgiving, won’t soon go away. Having a few drinks during the holidays can be all well and good, but it’s one of indulgences we’d be better off avoiding in the season of excesses.

Not Coming Home for Christmas

Drinking and driving can easily lead to missing out on great holiday events. Regardless of what old Saint Nick may want, jails and police officers don’t take the holidays off. This means that a person pulled over for drinking and driving will quickly wind up behind bars, and it’s a well-known fact that Santa Claus can’t find the chimneys on county jails.

Sadly, drunk driving can stop others from making it home for the holidays in much more tragic ways. Statistics show that there is a huge spike in DUI related deaths from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day. In fact, an average of 45 people are killed in alcohol-related crashes every day during this time of year. Sadly, these deaths spike on the dates of the holidays themselves, and Thanksgiving has the highest rate of deaths in the season.

Other Tidings of Unenthusiastic Joy

There’s no doubt that not getting home for the holidays or, even worse, stopping others from getting home is likely the harshest outcome of driving under the influence; but these disastrous outcomes aren’t the only consequences that can occur. Those arrested for drunk driving can face confiscation of their vehicle, mandatory ignition interlock devices and even expensive alcohol awareness classes.

One of the most unfavorable legal repercussions of getting a DUI, however, is the loss of a person’s license. Regardless of which state they live in, their license is likely to be revoked on the spot. This can prevent them from getting to and from work, which will make buying Christmas presents much more difficult. On top of that, they’ll have trouble figuring out how to get ‘out of the house’ after the holidays, without their driving privileges.

If You’re Too Drunk to Know You Are

There are a few steps that you can take to stay safe and avoid a criminal charge during the holidays. The most important is to not drink and drive, and this holds true regardless of how much alcohol you have consumed. It’s important to remember that not everyone gets bright red Santa cheeks to show they are intoxicated – just a simple “buzz” is sometimes enough to be over the legal driving limit.

If the family will be enjoying drinks, it’s essential to ensure that there’s a designated driver if any transportation is planned after the festivities of the evening. Santa doesn’t have much traffic to worry about in his sleigh, and his reindeer are probably pretty good at steering, even if jolly old Saint Nick got too jolly. Unfortunately, nobody else has this advantage, so staying off the road while intoxicated is essential.

The attorneys at www.powmac.com suggest that drinking and driving is never a good idea, but during the holidays when people across the country are hitting the road for family gatherings, this regrettable act can prove especially tragic. Anyone who engages in this behavior will undoubtedly end up on Santa’s ‘Naughty List’ for years to come. What they should be truly worried about, however, is being on the State Police’s list. Unless a person’s Christmas wish list includes an ignition interlock device and donations to their inflated insurance premium fund, it’s best for them to steer clear of the driver’s seat when intoxicated.

Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/aidanmorgan/3083316643/



Leave a Reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>